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this was an utter, unmitigated disaster for the security of the united states and for the interest of the united states in the dangerous world we live in. the sanctimonious comments by general holder today are this, self-serving and self-centered. we ought to be concerned of what is in the interest of the united states of america. you nailed it absolutely right. what good is there to be gained by trying these mass murderers, war criminals in civilian courts with rules designed for conventional crimes committed by conventional criminals as general mukazie once said. they'll challenge the way they were treated and what about the chain of evidence and did we have all the constitutional nicities in a war? they're going to proclaim outrageous treatment and lie about it because they've got the world stage and this will serve to recruit additional jihaddists because they're going to attack america throughout this entire episode, the sorry episode and they're going to try and get support throughout the muslim world for their cause by ex-core eighting -- excoriating the united states of america and our v
chance to mention just exactly what we do in the united states that t china. in the-- the minut& >> bill planning with the pres thank you very much. now here's maggie.-- >>> a drug. millions take zetia by merck, but renewing questions about whether it our dr. jennifer ashton is here with go y- this at length this morning b- becauecause so many people do take this this journ 200& for 14 months. som- others were taking an over the counter vitamin. wh >> had cardiovascular risk factors or t attack - they were already on a stat & - pconcont
moved back to the united states when i was a baby and lived there till i was five in rochester, new york. this was after it had become safe for war resisters. my father worked in a health clinic in the state, and my mother worked at a cable access channel. they both decided they preferred it in canada. my father preferred the single payer health care system. my father preferred that. my mother was working for the national film board, which is a public institution that allowed her to make the political films that she wanted to make. they left the u.s. because of stayed in canada because of the social programs. >> do you remember when you first learned of this story and it sunk in? >> in canada, you did not have to be rich to get sick. i feel i always knew the story about health care. this was explained to me as a kid. i did understand that it was unfair that people were denied access to medicine because they did not have money to pay. as a doctor, my father preferred to work in a system whereby money did not have anything to do with the care that you received. i feel like i have always k
with the united states both economic and security. the obama administration really doesn't want to revisit all of that, but president obama said on the record he understand that a new party coming to power will want to take a look at all the underlying agreements negotiated with the united states by the liberal democratic party. the big issues that will be on the table between these two leaders -- climate change, north korea, and trade. one other issue, of course, is afghanistan with the democratic party of japan came in, the prime minister decided to end a long-standing refueling operation the japanese were conducting with vessels in the indian ocean. but in exchange, the japanese government has put up funds in reconstruction aid. botin the main, this summit, the second time the two leaders have met is not going to produce any new u.s.-japanese announcement on any of the issues i discussed but it will be an opportunity for the two to discuss trade, north korea and climate change. steve: major, just a moment ago the white house office of the press secretary released something. apparently the u
and shakers of the united states of america. that is why i am here. that is why i am doing this luncheon. i feel like -- the gratitude is out of this world right now for having me do this. it really quick, i want to thank everybody for this honor. i want to thank you for inviting me to speak. the recorders of the industry and all of the change agents, you, the press, has a very special responsibility, and that is to be a mirror for us to see ourselves, our community, our country, and the rest of the world, and a truly respect the rule that you play in our system. i am sure that many of you are asking why would i want to speak at the national press club in washington, d.c., and why would they invite me? i make my living by stringing together verses or playing a part in some movie or television series that you may all have seen, "law and order," by the way. what would ludacris have to say? what would i have to say about leadership? i am going to say a lot of different things, so take what i say a word for word. you wonder if i plan to run for office, maybe for president in 2012. you do not ha
to be friends. >> the united states does not seek to contain china nor does a deeper relationship of china mean a weakening of bilateral alliances. on the contrary. the rietz of a strong prosperous china can be a source of strength for community of nations. >> as parted of his charm offensive before midnight tonight eastern time about an hour, 45 minutes from now the president is scheduled to participate in a town hall style meeting with an audience of mostly young people in the big chinese city of shanghai with the latest on that from shanghai major garrett who is traveling with the president joins us. hey, major, what's the buzz on this town hall? is it expected to be adoring or confrontational? >>> oo it will probably be something in between. they are dickering or fighting over each other in the contours or consent to the town mall. to circumvent the election to control the events being imposed to president obama the white house invited and collected through the u.s. embassy questions through the web site for the past couple weeks. the president will get those unseen in the course of the tow
basically has completely destroyed the power of the united states by his namby-pamby stuff on intelligence, by his huge budget deficit and gigantic expansion of the debt. he's made the united states into a beg ar nation. and if you like obama, you think he's weak. if you don't like him, you think he's just wrong and sometimes bad intentioned. i learned something the other day that just blew my minds. obama announced that he wasn't going to put missiles in poland, and he did that on september 17. now, apart from my wife's birthday, that date has no significance to me. but to the polls it does. it was the date russia invaded poland in 1939. and to remove the missile shield on that gate was effectively telling the russians, come on in, she's yours. and obama knew it. had to have known it. that state department would have flagged that and said don't do it on the 17th. he did it to send a message to russia saying, she's all yours, kid. sean: that's a frightening thought. dick, good to see you. don't forget, we're going to have the first cable exclusive interview with sarah palin on her brand-ne
president obama has held frequently here in the united states, a question and answer session. >that kind of thing does not happen in china. the president's words were blocked online and the event shown only on regional tv. he told the crowd that he is a supporter of non-century ship, adding that he kills a free flow of information only strengthens society. >> the more freely information flows, the stronger the society becomes because then citizens of countries around the world can hold their own government accountable. i have a lot of critics of the united states o can say all things about me. i think that makes our democracy stronger. >> he then moved to beijing with the chinese leader. his host greeted him warmly and the president used his face-to- face meeting to echo his team. >> we do not seek to impose any system of government on any other nation. but we also don't believe that the prciples that we stand for are unique to our nation. these freedoms of expression and worship, access to information and political participation, we believe, are universal rights. >> president obama says
hnology is more important than ever in driving the united states economy and also 33 percent saying united states will be the global tech leader and a lot of americans think we will not. why is that? >> there's good reason to be concerned. it's not so much that america's innovation pro west is lagging but that the rest of the world is catching us. the recession has not helped with unemployment at ten percent we have good minds not contributing to the economy and we've seen anybody incorporate america has seen a lot of projects and r and d spending cut back as companies try to trim costs as their top line as shrunk so the survey captures the notion that both in the long-term and short-term there's things to be concerned about. > the first paragraph of the story says by most measures, america remains the world leader in technology achievement. consider the 2009 nobel prize winners of the 13 people honored nine were america's. not bad, right? >> but the nobel is a lagging indicator that people earn that typically at the end of their career for work that took place in many cases years and years pri
, the president should be aware the jobs people are worried about in the united states are getting people back to work. we have 15 million people out of work. our priorities are skewed here. we have things to take care of her at home. why are we worrying about afghanistan? it really raises questions about the extent of the pentagon's influence on the administration. >> why do you think the president is doing it? many people thought the president came from the same side of the tracks that you're on, generally speaking, in terms of the limits of u.s. power in the world and the need to rejoin the world community and not to be hawkish. what do you make of his decision? why do you think he moved that direction? >> well, i think it's going to be a tough one to defend. and you're right about the -- we've seen the limits of u.s. coercion, and this government in afghanistan is a corrupt government. everyone knows that. sooner or later, the kind of consensus government which afghanistan has had historically is going to have to be reinstituted so people in afghanistan will have control over their own des
the united states senate votes on whether to let debate on the health care reform bill begin. the republicans are all voting nay. if the democrats can't get 60 votes, that's it. it's over. it looks like they can do it. health care leaves the senate station. the top of the show tonight. >>> plus president obama has his chin out on just about every hot issue out there. health care, terror trials, job losses, even the breast cancer report. he is exposed and vulnerable. his poll numbers are dropping. is he just too darned intellectual? too much the egg head? why did he bow to that japanese emperor? why did he pick tim geithner to be his economic front man? why all of this dithering over afghanistan? and who thought it was a wonderful idea to bring the killers of 9/11 to new york city? the media capital of the world to tell their story? is obama channeling adlai stevenson? and 46 years after the jfk assassination, sunday is the anniversary. we are still learning fascinating details in the frantic hours after the shooting. especially about lbj. the author of a new book on the kennedy assassination
. >> do you believe you are capable and can do the job of the president of the united states? >> we will preview my interview with governor palin in the body language segment. don't miss this one. bill: hi, i am bill o'reilly. rough month for president obama. while he had difficulty trying to convince the chinese government to act civilized, nothing he faces when he returns home tomorrow. ft. hood and afghanistan and health care all put the president on the defensive. his approval rating has dropped below 50% for the first time. but he is a shrewd guy. he made himself available while in asia. >> will you sign legislation on health care that includes the stew pact language? >> i thank you is a balance to be achieved that is consistent with the amendment, what existed before we reformed health care. i believe in the basic idea that federal dollars should not pay for abortions. but i also think we should not restrict women's choices. >> does the language strike that balance? >> not yet. bill: the president wants it both ways. he knows forcing pro-life taxpayers to fund abortion is wron
five men that planned the attacks of 9/11 will face justice in the united states. just blocks from where the world trade center used to stand. some college victory for the rule of law. others call it a slap in the face. eric holder show that he was not about to apologize for the decision when some of the senators went after him. here is an example. >> you talked about the best chances to prosecute, one of the factors has to be that he has at least at some point asked to plead guilty. you must have taken that into account. >> that was then. i do not know what he wants to do now, and i will not base the determination on what a murderer wants to do. he will not select the prosecution venue, i will select it, and i have. shepard: the murderer said that he wanted to die here. that was the beginning of the exchange. the attorney general extended his position, saying that the world will see collied shake muhammed for the tower that he is. -- holly shake muhammed -- collied shake muhammed for the murderer that he is. >> the administration said that they were not making this a law enforceme
. >> i am looking at this from the threat that this poses to the united states. i think it is unwise for the president to move these individuals and these trials into a civilian court in new york city. trace: security concerns are not the only issue. consider the context for millions of americans who live and work in new york. this decision has profound and personal implications for them because this was their city that was attacked. it was their family and friends who died. while some of those most affected will no doubt lineup to seek justice exacted on those accused of the crime, others argue the suspects and should never be allowed to set foot anywhere near the sacred earth of ground zero, where so many lives were lost. jamie colby has more reaction from family members. first, catherine herridge as live in washington. what is the effect of trying these suspects in civilian court? >> thanks. prosecutors in new york must begin anew. charges must be brought, the motions and the hearings. the militant -- the military courts are now null and void. once transferred, the five men, inclu
later, after the pentagon papers, erwin griswold, the solicitor general of the united states, who argued the pentagon papers case on behalf of the nixon administration, wrote a story for "the washington post" saying that in fact there was no national security issues whatsoever, and that he as a lawyer had to use every bit of ingenuity and creativity to even make an arguable case pits if anyone wants to read that, i am sure the attorneys in this room would. "the washington post, irwin griswald. you can check out on nexis lexus. no national security issues of all. >> pennsylvania is an elected state at the federal level, as far as appointments. but every once in awhile, it gets played out as to whether pennsylvania should go to some combination -- excuse me -- appointed intellect. i'm going to ask and academic, john, to talk first about that topic. where do you think it should wind up? should it stay the way it is? judges close to home like county judges, are they electable in the sense that people know that? where is it if you go statewide -- or is it if you go statewide? >> at the local
the train is leaving the station. tomorrow night the united states senate. votes on whether to let debate on the health care reform bill begin. the republicans are all voting nay. if the democrats can't get 60 votes, that's it. it's over. it looks like they can do it. health care leaves the senate station. the top of the show tonight. >>> plus president obama has his chin out on just about every hot issue out. there health care, terror trials, job losses, even the breast cancer report. he is exposed and vulnerable. his poll number are dropping. is he just too darned intellectual? too much the egg head? why did he bow to that japanese emperor? why did he pick tim geithner to be his economic front man? why thought dithering over afghanistan and who thought it was a wonderful idea to write the killers of 9/11 to new york city? the media capital of the world so they could tell their story? is obama channeling adlai stevenson? >>> and sunday is the anniversary of the jfk. what really happened in the frantic hours after the shooting. especially about lbj. the author of a new book on the kennedy
with the united states as the only nation in the industrialize think world that does not guarantee health care to all people. yet we spend substantially more than any other country and our outcomes are worse. clearly we need major health care reform. >> that's a point of view from the liberal democrats. senator greg, what is the republican view on health care? how is it different from the democrat view? this is a strict party line vote we're seeing tomorrow night. >> well, clearly we disagree with senator sanders. i really respect bernie's forthrightedness. he is telling it like it is, a single payer system like the english or canadian system. we genuinely believe a single payer system will undermine the quality of health care in this country. and it is not affordable. this bill is a $2.5 trillion-dollar bill. that's what it spends when it is fully phased in over a ten-year period. it would if it led to a single payer system. and i happen to think it is a precursor to that. put the government in charge of every aspect of health care in a very direct way so that you would end up with basically
family. >> fred, fred, fred. she ran for vice president of the united states last year, she is running for president next time. let me ask you, fred, if you had to choose between sheer confidence and ability to be the next president, mitt romney, or sarah palin? who is more competent to be the next president, the next republican nominee for president? >> oh, come on, you know i'm not going to answer. i think we've got four or five -- four or five -- >> you said she is not even running. but fred, i caught you. i caught you. he said she is not even running. you -- i caught you right there. your hesitancy. you said she is not a candidate. >> you said who is more qualified. who is more qualified. >> what you've got to understand, it's better to lose with goldwater than to win with rockefeller. when the pendulum comes your way, you want the people you believe in who are going to do the things you went into politics to get done to be there, not just to be in power and say we've got an honor by our name in the white house. >> here is a question for you, fred, and you have been in the campaign
't have enough jails there why do we have any jails empty in the united states at taxpayer expense? maybe that's a whole another issue. why do we have a whole federal prison sitting there? is it because some of these prisoners in california are not federal prisoners? peter: only 200 minimum security prisoners at that facility at this point. and we don't mix state and federal prison population. gretchen: but we will bring terrorists there? on its face it seems weird to me that we wouldn't be able to find some use of this prison, instead of bringing some of the world's worst terrorists there. steve: and we were talking about whoever becomes members of that jury for can a lead sheik mohammed their families could be a target. the people of the surrounding area there in illinois, some of them feel like you bring these guys here then suddenly we will be the focus of jihadi and stuff like that. we don't like that. congressman kirk who is going to join us in 45 minutes wrote this letter to the administration. quote: steve: mark kirk is going to be joining us very promptly to talk about that gitmo
for afghanistan. >> the united states cannot be engaged in an open-ended commitment. >> his attorney general prosecutes the plot's masterm d mastermind. >> in a courthouse just blocks away from where the twin towers once stood. >> this is a big step in the wrong direction. >>> topics this morning for our headliners. secretary of state hillary clinton and former new york mayor, rudy giuliani. hillary and rudy only on "this week." >>> then -- >> we don't have to continue to go down this controversy road. >> she's back. >>> george will, gwen ifill of pbs. david brooks of "the new york "mother jones." corn from >>> and as always, the sunday funnies. >> before john mccain chose her as his running mate, his campaign spent $50,000 on a background check. when he heard this, john mccain said we should have spent $75,000. >>> and we begin today with the secretary of state hillary clinton. thanks for spending time with us this morning. >> it's a pleasure to talk with you from singapore, george. >> wel and as you're in singapore, you and the president are facing really his toughest decision yet on afg
by the position on the economy. i want to show you the map. this is the united states if you notice the elevation, the higher the state, the higher the unemployment rate. this is what happened last month, if the state is red, the rate went up last month. if the state is green, it came down a little bit in the last month. michigan has the highest in the country, but it came down a bit last month. nevada is high and it came down last month. look at all of the red. 29 states the rate went up last month. we asked in the cnn polling what do you think of economic conditions today? 82% say the economy is in bad shape and then you asked the follow-up question, politically who is to blame for this? right now 38% blame the republicans, 27% the democrats. in may it was 53% republicans and 21% democrats. so james carville if you're looking at that tep months or so in the obama administration. you see a trend in the polling. you're in charge now so you will get more in the blame. >> who are the 18% that didn't think it was bad. i'm curious about these people. >> you are. >> as you would expect that you get fu
. another one of the controversies here is the aid with the united states. we have an enormous coal. forget the humanitarian reasons. a stable government -- we have an enormous goal. there is the homegrown terrorism that gets sent over to the united states, but they do not like it when we give them aid, and we say there are strings attached to it. >> we had a lot of discussion about that, because this became a very big issue. pakistan, and i do not think most of us in america really understood what is the beef? we are trying to demonstrate a long-term commitment to the development of pakistan, to your energy sector, to your infrastructure, the kinds of things that will provide a greater level of stability for the people of pakistan because their incomes will be rising, in their futures will look better. in the three days that i have been here, we could have raised some things differently. we could have been a little more sensitive to how we are perceived. i have been very clear. "look, if you guys do not want the aid, you do not have to take it. i think is important that we have this relati
and during her address, which she is delivering right now on the floor of the united states senate, senator lincoln says that it's time to begin the debate and it's not time to walk away. she says she is not afraid of the debate over health care reform. she says she is against the so-called public option, the government-run option that is the center piece of the piece of legislation that is currently on the floor of the senate, even though she's against that piece of the legislation, she says, it will not stop her from voting wre, yes, along with the rest of her democratic colleagues in helping to move this process one step forward. this is not a vote on the actual health care reform bill itself, but rather, a procedural vote that's an important step in the process, it allows the senate a majority leader reid to bring this to debate. with the yes vote of senator lincoln from arkansas, the 60 vote threshold has been reached. and the vote will be taken at eight o'clock eastern time and for now, senator reid can listen to the remainder of his colleagues speak as they have been doing all after
the job of the president of the united states? >> i believe that i am, but that's not to say that i'm putting myself out there to campaign or anything else. >> no not to say that, but you believe that you're smart enough, incisive enough, intellectual enough to handle the most powerful job in the world? do you believe that? >> i believe that i am because i have common sense and i have, i believe, the values that are reflective of so many other american values. >> joining the panel this week wall street journal editorial riley and kim strassel, to you first. do you think that sarah palin now looks presidential? >> well, i'm less concerned about her qualifications per se for being president and more interested in the question of whether she's the right to beat barack obama in 2012. if as we're told by the polesters, republicans need to win back these independent voters, that they lost to obama last year, is she the right person to do that? and we don't have a huge sample here to go by, but we do have the elections earlier this month. we had two republican gubernatorial candidates, one
the president there will want to know china's latest thoughts on containing with the united states the united states nuclear program. bret: major, that is not all that is on the president's schedule in coming hours, right? >> that's correct. i will sit down on behalf of the fox news channel with an interview with president obama and some other correspondents here will do the same. we will cover a lot of issues, iran, north korea, trade in this region, climate change, jobs and healthcare back home. we're going to try to hit all the bases in a slightly different respect. bret: it should be interesting. majoring thank you. you can see that interview "special or the" six p.m. eastern tomorrow. let's look at the debt relationship now between the u.s. and china. how did we get in such a hole and is it going to get biger? here is correspondent wendell goler. >> it's the elephant in the room that aides say the two leaders didn't talk about, china's huge holding of u.s. treasury bonds. >> the $800 billion never came up in conversation, and the president dealt with every issue on his agenda in a very d
-paying jobs in the united states. export promotion would be something we could do without spending money. there may be tax provisions that may encouraging highering sooner are remember than than later, so we're looking at those. it is important to wreck r. recognize that if we keep on adding to the debt, even in the midst of this recovery, that a at some point people could lose confidence in the u.s. economy in a way that could lead to a double-dip recession, so one of the trickiest things that we're doing right now is to, on the one hand, make sure that the recovery is supported, and not withdraw a lot of money either with tax increases or big spending cuts and states, for example, need a lot of support to keep hiring teachers and so forth, and at the same time making sure we're setting up a pathway long term for the reduction. it is about as hard of a play as there is, but it's what we have to do, and whatever jobs, additional jobs legislation comes out with has to fit into that broader framework. >> does it raise the deficit or not? >> we haven't seen that and that's part of the reaso
for president. >> well, here is the big question. do you ever want to be president of the united states? >> that certainly isn't on my radar screen right now. but when you consider some of the ordinary turning into extraordinary events that have happened in my life, i am not one to predict what will happen in a few years. my ambition, if you will, my desire, is to help our country in whatever role that may be. and i cannot predict what that will be, what doors would be opened in the year 2012. >> we were talking, she used the word ambition. if she had said my ambition -- my passion or commitment it would have had a different reaction to people and they pay attention to that. sean: you're really good at what you do. you advise politicians and advise a lot of people in the public arena how to deal with the media. but maybe if she -- one of the things she talks about in the campaign is she couldn't be sarah. if she would have listened to you, and become the little contrived -- does she become a little canned, does she become a little -- >> she became contrived and canned because of what wa
trafficking is actually done out of the prison system in the united states. particularly the california prison system. and he mentioned one prison, pelican bay, in specific. and then i came back, and i found that there are all these cell phones in prisons which enables a group, name live the mexican mafia, to essentially use cell phones to give directives right out of prisons on hits, on territories, on dealers, and i think this is a very serious thing. i've introduced legislation that would make cell phones contraband in federal prisons with possession punishable by up to an additional year in prison. what do you think of this? what are you doing? it is a real problem, mr. attorney general. >> it is a real problem, senator. i had experience with that when i was the united states attorney here in washington, d.c. rapel edmonds was convicted, sent to jail and continued to run his drug enterprise from prison, was convicted again for that. the maintenance of cell phones in prison, i think, is unacceptable and i think we have to find ways in which we conif i skate them. you're right, they ought to
president of the united states, not head of the republican party, she needs to broaden her coalition. the problem with that -- >> this country -- they might do it again. thank you ron brownstein, chris cilliz cillizza. join us tomorrow night at 5:00 eastern for more "hardball." time for "the ed show" with ed schultz zblrngs good evening, americans. welcome to "the ed show" tonight from new york. one week from tonight the president of the united states is going to lay out his strategy for afghanistan. newspapers are reporting today that the president will add, here's the number, 34,000 additional troops over the next year. president obama gave a preview to this decision this afternoon. >> after eight years, some of those years in which we did not have, i think, either the resources or the strategy to get the job done, it is my intention to finish the job. >> finish the job. make no mistake, this is just one more mess that president obama has to mop up after the bush administration. bush was the president who drained resources from afghanistan so we could go invade iraq on that perfect
that lead to decisions being made that will benefit the united states and move us toward goals like more peaceful prosperous outcomes for us and many parts of the world. secondly, i think it is important to underscore that we see the fight against al qaeda and the syndicate of terror in the security interest of the united states. i think that kind of got lost the last eight years with a lot of talk about how it wasn't important to get bin ladin, you know, that we were there for some other reason. no. it's critical to get those who attacked us. that is what we are there for and what we are trying to do is to assess the best way forward so that we can go anywhere in the united states and anywhere in the world and say the same thing. you have to understand that we believe this syndicate of terror is a threat, not just to the united states and our friends and allies, but to pakistan, afghanistan and many others. >> let me turn to the issue of china where you and the president head next. the lead of the new york times story out this morning about the president's story there says this. >> with
. >>> plus, is the united states still a superpower? the president came back from his trip to asia pretty much empty handed. we're fighting two wars, our economy is in tatters. has the sun set on the american empire. >> for the last 20 years the united states has had no rivals. we now have serious competitors. >>> should religion be used as a political weapon? patrick kennedy says he's been told not to take communion because of his support for abortion rights. >> he said the fact that i don't agree with all the teachings of the church doesn't make me less of a catholic. well, in fact it >> should this be part of politics. >>> and a story that seems like science fiction but it's all true. doctors discover a man who seemed to be in a coma for 23 years actually heard every word they said. the amazing true story of what he calls his second birth. >>> this is your only source for news. cnn primetime begins now. here's campbell brown. >>> hi, everybody, we're going to start tonight as always with the "mash-up." we're watching it all so you don't have to. first, tonight, there is breaking news f
in the united states. a lot of those democrats, however, in congress right now are very moderate. a lot of them are not for comprehensive immigration reform. none want to take a vote on immigration right now. it is the new third rail of american politics. but obama made promises in that area and so did a lot of more liberal democrats. the hispanic caucus is growing in influence. i think that's kind of the next policy piece to explode in washington. host: our guests have been patricia murphy. the wsi attached to our website. also joining us, jillian bandies. again, their website attached to the c-span website as well. thank you for joining us. we're going to do a short bit of phones and then we're going to talk about bus service in the united states. we'll be right back. [captioning performed by national captioning institute] [captions copyright national cable satellite corp. 2009] >> washington journal continues. >> host: if you want to weigh in on the short period of open phones, the numbers are on the bottom of your screen. the financial times has a story about army recruitment, military recr
, and because the united states started the battle in muslim countries. has sn accused of shooting and killing 13 people at ft. hood. s he is still in the hospital. >>> and president obama is in china. china financed massive sums of u.s. debt. part of the president's talks may include assurances those investments are safe. the president held a town hall meeting with college students in shanghai where he push for greater freedoming in china. >> we do not seek to impose any system of government on any other nation, but we also don't believe that the principles that we stand for are unique to our nation. these freedoms are expression and worship, are access to information and political participation, we believe, are universal rights and should be available to all people, including ethnic and religious minorities, whether they are in the united states, china or any nation. >> president obama will also visit china's great wall today. >>> and the obama administration says people trying to politicize the president's vow to japan's emperor and every pris are way, way off base. president obama greeted
, the united states has been using a base technology to create vaccine. while it is safe and effective, it's a slow-moving process. across europe, vaccine developers are using the faster process of incorporating the million sales to grow the vaccine. as we begin to explore cell-based technology, i would pose the question will there be an adequate fda approval for this new vaccine? i'm also interested in hearing in the vaccine manufacturers from how they ramped up reduction in some cases to ten times their normal production schedule. we know that production of a delayed for h1n1, a harmful but relatively moderate virus compared to something more lethal like the spanish flu. but in the case of a stronger virus, the higher fatality rate, what our country be able to produce enough vaccine for everyone in a short time. here it so i look forward to questioning the witnesses, welcome them again, learning more about how we can improve vaccine reduction in our country and again thank the chairman for this joint an important hearing. i yield back. >> thank you ms. eshoo. gentleman from pennsylvania,
in asia. >> the united states does not seek to contain china. on the contrary. the rise of a strong and a prosperous china can be a source of strength for the community of nations. gwen: and in afghanistan -- >> there is now a clear window of opportunity for president karzai and his government to make a new compact with the people of afghanistan. gwen: while on the home front, sarah palin turns best selling author. >> alaska and michigan have so much in common, with the hockey moms and the fishing. gwen: but what else does she have in mind? covering the week, karen tumulty of "time" magazine, david sanger of "the new york times," doyle mcmanus of "the los angeles times," and john dickerson of "slate" magazine and cbs news. >> celebrating 40 years of journalistic excellence, live from our nation's capital, this is "washington week" with gwen ifill, produced in association with "national journal." corporate funding for "washington week" is provided by -- >> the john hopkins global m.b.a., integrating global expertise with international understanding to develop leaders for a better wor
, developed by some of the highly regarded independence institutions in the united states, are meeting with strong resistance. >> i want to know as soon as possible if they have a cancer. if i'm only going to get a mammogram every two years and i have missed something for every two years, the impact on that patient is immeasurable. >> reporter: the researchers stress that finding tumors early does not always translate into saving lives and this vast body of evidence speaks for itself. >> women need to understand that there is a small additional benefit from starting screening at age 40 to 49, compared with starting later. but there also are a set of couple la lating harms. >> reporter: the big problem is between between the ages of 40 and 49 could have denser breasts, which could mean screenings more unreliable. that could mean more false positives, higher tests and higher costs and more pain for the patient. one of the most high-powered organizations which disagrees with the american cancer society, which still recommends the routine annual screening. >> the reason we make that recomm
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